What Is A Tricky Word?

What is the weirdest word?

Here are the fifteen most unusual words in the English language.Serendipity.

This word appears in numerous lists of untranslatable words.

Gobbledygook.

Scrumptious.

Agastopia.

Halfpace.

Impignorate.

Jentacular.

Nudiustertian.More items…•.

What is the difference between a Decodable word and a tricky word?

These words have been called ‘sight’ words in the past as beginner readers would not be able to sound them out and they were taught to remember them by sight. They are also called ‘tricky’ or phonically ‘irregular’. … Once you have learned ‘ay’ the word ‘say’ becomes phonically decodable or regular.

What are the hardest words to spell?

Top 10 hardest words to spellWeird. … Intelligence. … Pronunciation. … Handkerchief. … logorrhea. … Chiaroscurist. … Pochemuchka. A Russian term used when a person asks too many questions. … Gobbledegook. Gobbledegook is incoherent babbling in a fashion that makes no sense amounting to random words and noises to your listeners.More items…•

What are red words in reading?

Red words are trick words. These are words that cannot be sounded out because they break the phonetic rules of the English Language. Helpful tips to practice spelling Red Words: ➢ Say the letters as you write them, NOT the sounds (since they cannot be sounded out).

What is the difference between tricky words and high frequency words?

These are known as High-Frequency Words or HFW. For example: it, and. Your child will also be taught Tricky Words. Tricky words are also words that pop up frequently in our everyday reading but are ones that usually do not follow the phonetic patterns taught.

What word takes 3 hours to say?

ISOLEUCINE. Note the ellipses. All told, the full chemical name for the human protein titin is 189,819 letters, and takes about three-and-a-half hours to pronounce.

What are the most difficult words in English?

As a follow up to our article on confusing words, here are ten of the most difficult words in English.Literally. If you know a language purist, watch out. … Ironic. … Irregardless (instead of regardless) … Whom. … Colonel. … Nonplussed. … Disinterested. … Enormity.More items…

What year is phase 4 phonics?

split into 6 phases: • Phase 1 is introduced in the Nursery • Phases 2 and 3 are introduced in Reception • Phases 4 and 5 are introduced in Year 1 • Phase 6 is introduced in Year 2. In EYFS and KS1 your child will be taught phonics every day.

What are the first letters to teach?

What Order to Introduce the Alphabet Letters:s, a, t, i, p, n.c, k, e, h, r.m, d, g, o.l, f, b, q, u.j, z, w.v, y, x.

What is Phase 4 letters and sounds?

When children start Phase Four of the Letters and Sounds phonics programme, they will know a grapheme for each of the 42 phonemes. … The main aim of this phase is to consolidate the children’s knowledge and to help them learn to read and spell words which have adjacent consonants, such as trap, string and milk.

What are sounding words called?

Phonetic reading and writing is a behavior the child exhibits that involves “sounding out” words the way they are written or writing words the way they sound (again, relating to the way letters represent speech sounds).

What are the 5 longest words?

10 Longest Words in the English LanguagePneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis (45 letters) … Hippopotomonstrosesquippedaliophobia (36 letters) … Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (34 letters) … Pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (30 letters) … Floccinaucinihilipilification (29 letters) … Antidisestablishmentarianism (28 letters)More items…•

What are the Phase 3 tricky words?

What are the Phase 3 Tricky Words? Phase 3 Tricky Words include we, be, me, he, she, my, they, was, her & all.

How many jolly phonics tricky words are there?

72 tricky wordsThey can learn the Jolly Phonics 72 tricky words. They can learn them through a saying or any fun activity. Order an online practise book. There is a single worksheet in that for every 72 tricky words.

Are common exception words tricky words?

Common exception words are words that do not follow the common phonetic spelling rules children learn in Year 1 and Year 2. These are also called tricky words or sight words as you must learn to recognise them, and can’t sound them out. They aren’t decodable using the normal rules and letter-sounds in phonics.

What are common exceptions Year 1?

The statutory requirements of the Year 1 Spelling Curriculum include the common exception words: the, a, do, to, today, of, said, says, are, were, was, is, his, has, I, you, your, they, be, he, me, she, we, no, go, so, by, my, here, there, where, love, come, some, one, once, ask, friend, school, put, push, pull, full, …

What are the examples of tricky words?

Tricky words are typically part of the phonic code. The word ‘want’ has the ‘o’ sound instead of ‘a,’ which is how it’s spelt. This means that children find it difficult to read out the word, as the sounds don’t accompany the letters. Other tricky words include: was, swan, they, my and are.

How do you teach tricky words?

The standard way to first introduce ‘tricky words’ is to show the children the word, and then try to sound it out. By doing this you demonstrate why it is ‘tricky’ because it will make a silly word. They often find this bit quite funny!

What is tricky words in Jolly Phonics?

‘Tricky words’ are sometimes called ‘key words’ or ‘phonically irregular high-frequency words’. They are now also called ‘common exception words’. They used to be called ‘sight words’ but this term is no longer used in synthetic phonics.